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What are the Different Types of Teacher Training Programs?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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There are two general paths toward teaching certification, and the two teacher training programs cater to two different types of people. The first option is the traditional approach, which means a student will attend a college or university to obtain a bachelor's degree in education before going on to complete a teacher training program. This one of the two options for teacher training programs prepares the student for the necessary exams one must take in order to become certified in a particular region of a country. The second of the two teacher training programs is the non-traditional approach, in which a student obtains a degree in an unrelated field and chooses to become a teacher after the undergraduate degree is complete.

The latter of the two teacher training programs can be more work, but it allows a person who has completed a degree in another area to still enter the teaching field, as well as helping people who have worked in other fields to transition to the teaching field. This can happen a few different ways: a person may obtain a teaching position and work on the teaching certification requirements while teaching full-time, or a person may work on certification steps before obtaining a teaching job. If a person is working as a teacher and simultaneously working on teaching certification, that person will need to obtain a temporary teaching certificate as well as fingerprint clearance in order to be allowed to teach in a classroom.

The traditional route of teacher training programs involves attending a college or university with an established teacher training program and coursework. A student will be able to choose what particular area of education he or she wants to focus on. For example, a student may choose to become trained as an elementary school teacher, or he or she may choose to become a secondary school teacher. Others may even choose to focus on a particular subject, preparing them to be an English teacher, biology teacher, or math teacher. The requirements for each program will differ, but some requirements will be similar regardless of the focus. All candidates will need to pass the appropriate examinations and obtain the proper certifications before teaching.

Candidates who choose the non-traditional route of teacher training programs will still need to take college level coursework and he or she will also still need to take the appropriate examinations, but he or she will be able to piece the coursework together and work on it all while teaching full time. This means the candidate will need to research the local teaching requirements and be sure to fulfill each of those requirements properly, sometimes without the guidance of a professional in the field.

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Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By lluviaporos — On Feb 11, 2014

@Mor - That's the theory, but unfortunately I think the reality is often that high school students are learning how to read properly as well. Or at least how to write.

I don't think many teacher training courses do enough emphasis on making sure the whole class is being helped. So many teachers will just focus on the middle of the road kids, or on the lower kids, or on the higher level kids and will leave everyone else to struggle as best they can.

Designing a course at any level that can suit everyone in the class takes a lot of ability.

By Mor — On Feb 11, 2014

@umbra21 - I think it depends on what level of student you're teaching as well. If you're teaching high school history, for example, I really think it's important for a person to have an actual degree in history, or at least something related. And high school students deserve good teachers, but they just don't need the kind of high intensity teaching that younger students need.

With younger students you are teaching them the basics from scratch. I mean, we take it for granted, but learning to read is an incredible feat of intelligence and memory and a teacher has to make sure that thirty kids can all do it at once.

By umbra21 — On Feb 10, 2014

It might seem more difficult to get a degree in a separate subject and then do additional teacher training, but if anything, I would suggest that this route will leave you at a disadvantage, depending on what kind of training you do.

In my experience, people will do a year at the most, and sometimes a lot less than that, assuming that since they know their subject, teaching it isn't going to be that difficult.

But teaching is very complex and difficult and no matter how well you think you know your subject, you can't really claim to know it until you've taught it.

If you're looking for courses in teacher training then I would go for the longer ones, with a lot of hands on experience. There just isn't any substitute and you don't want to be caught short when you have a class of your own.

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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