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What Does a Concrete Technician Do?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated: Mar 03, 2024

A concrete technician is a person who is an expert in the use of concrete for various applications. He or she will conduct various laboratory experiments to devise ways to use concrete and other materials properly, as well as working on job sites to oversee the process of pouring concrete. Once the concrete is poured and set, the technician will be responsible for inspecting the finished product to ensure it is safe and reliable. Before any projects begin, the technician may be consulted to determine what types of structures will need to be built, and how much concrete will be necessary for the project.

A person who wants to become a concrete technician will need to earn a high school diploma, and it is likely he or she will need to participate in a job training program or apprenticeship. Some employers may require a job candidate to hold an associate's degree or bachelor's degree in order to be considered for a position as a concrete technician. Math skills are very important for this position, as are basic science skills and a knowledge of the construction industry. Most technicians will spend some time working within the construction industry, particularly as it applies to the use of concrete.

A concrete technician will need to be educated about new technology and techniques as they pertain to concrete construction. He or she should be an authority when it comes to materials and how they interact with concrete, new building processes, inspection techniques, and more. Sometimes a concrete technician will be responsible for actually developing new techniques in the field and delivering instruction on those new techniques to other professionals. The technician should expect to work with other construction workers on site to ensure they are handling materials properly and pouring concrete in such a way that the finished product will be strong and free from defects.

Once the technician performs an inspection of a finished structure, he or she will need to determine if any imperfections will lead the structure to become unstable or unusable. If, for example, the concrete does not cure properly and cracks, the concrete technician must be able to determine whether those cracks will compromise the structure. Water can seep into cracks, freeze, and expand the cracks further, meaning the structure may become unsafe. Some cracks are not at risk for further damage, but the technician will need to make this determination.

Practical Adult Insights is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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