We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is a Project Coordinator?

By G. Melanson
Updated Mar 02, 2024
Our promise to you
Practical Adult Insights is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At Practical Adult Insights, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

A project coordinator is an administrative professional who ensures that the people and resources devoted to completing a goal are used appropriately. Sometimes also called a project facilitator, this person usually works under a manager to support one or more project teams. He or she is typically expected juggle a combination of responsibilities, including managing scheduling and communication among team members, coordinating meeting materials, and assisting members with transportation or relocation if necessary. Getting into the career often requires a background in a field related to the project goals and extensive experience working with groups and as a team leader.

Need for Coordinators

Major projects within a company, or between two or more separate organizations, often require a manager to oversee everything that is done. As a project becomes more complicated, with additional tasks or more team members added, it often becomes impossible for a single manager to handle everything involved in running the team. This is where a project coordinator comes in. He or she takes on some of the responsibilities of the manager to help ensure that the project goals are met.

Common Duties

Coordinating meetings and other conferences is an important function of a project coordinator. If the work involves collaboration among multiple people from different departments or organizations, for example, then he or she makes sure that the everyone is aware of when a meeting is scheduled and finds a place that can accommodate all of the attendees. Much of the work done by a facilitator involves talking with various team members and attending meetings with fellow employees.

In addition to providing administrative assistance, a project coordinator may also be required to handle travel and accommodation. This might only involve arranging transportation for all team members to offsite meetings by car. In cases where the group is made up of members from a wide region or even other countries, a project coordinator may need to help members of the team temporarily or permanently relocate nearer to where most of the meetings take place. In this scenario, he or she might assist with travel and housing accommodations, deal with immigration paperwork, and help members to adjust to a new environment.

Qualifications

As most projects involve the collaboration of teams of people, individuals who take on coordination roles often need strong communication skills. Time management is also critical, so good project coordinators typically need to be able to multitask and meet deadlines effectively. Additional experience being a member of a team or leading a team is also important.

An educational focus in a particular field is often helpful as well. For example, a coordinator for a software development team might have a degree in programming or software engineering. When the coordinator understands what the team is doing, he or she can better help the team achieve its goals.

Salary And Other Bonuses

This position is often relatively high in a company, so a project coordinator usually gets paid more than other team members, though he or she still works under the manager. Some employers also offer bonuses for ensuring that a project is completed on schedule and within the allocated budget. As companies take on bigger projects, they often recognize how important a well organized team is. Individuals with the necessary background and skills in project coordination can usually find work with a wide array of employers.

Practical Adult Insights is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Discussion Comments
By anon143897 — On Jan 18, 2011

A Project Management Professional certification is helpful, in short known as a PMP. This takes many hours of provable project experience and intense study (to pass the PMP test). It is, however, quickly becoming a necessity in the corporate world.

By turtlez — On Jul 15, 2010

You really have to have an outgoing and bubbly personality in order to become a good, efficient Project Manager. Failure to have good social skills or adaptability issues can set you up for disappointment when it comes to your dreams of being a Project Manager.

By ChickenLover — On Jul 15, 2010

In most cases, wecallherana, you're supposed to have a degree in your desired field like IT or Computer Networking let's say. Most Project Managers don't walk into the industry as a made man, they have had to work their tail off for years in order to prove their worth. Most Project Managers get paid a hefty salary, though, and it's worth the time and effort they put into their job.

By wecallherana — On Jul 15, 2010

Being a Project Manager means that you're basically the "Go To" guy for each company involved in whatever deal might be going on. Most Project Managers have to start from the bottom of the company they work for and work up the corporate ladder in order to gain this title, but I'm not too sure on what kind of degree or certifications you would need to become a PM...?

Practical Adult Insights, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

Practical Adult Insights, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.