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How do I Become a Hotel Steward?

By Jill Gonzalez
Updated: Mar 02, 2024

In order to become a hotel steward in the United States, you do not need to have any particular type of educational background. Many employers do require applicants to be high school graduates, but this is not always the case. A college degree is rarely requested, though it could be helpful to you if you have aspirations of someday working in a management position.

For the most part, hotel stewards are responsible for maintaining and operating a variety of equipment. This is normally restricted to kitchen areas, but some employers may request that you also work in other parts of the hotel. If you want to become a hotel steward, you should have an aptitude for cleaning all areas of a kitchen, including sinks, dishwashing machines, and food preparatory areas.

Some positions could require you to act in the capacity of an inspector, which means that you might also have some supervisory responsibilities. You may be required to go over certain tools, equipment, or areas that have already been cleaned to ensure that they were sanitized properly. If they were not, you may be the person responsible for cleaning those items again. In some positions, you could simply have to tell another employee to take care of the improperly cleaned items. The supervisory roles that you might hold will vary between employers.

If you want to excel in this type of job, you should be in good enough physical condition to stand on your feet for extended periods of time. In order to become a hotel steward, you also need to be prepared to participate in fairly vigorous activities throughout each work day. In some positions, you might be required to lift or carry heavy objects.

You could need to be knowledgeable of a variety of different safety and security procedures to do well in this type of job. If you want to become a hotel steward, you may have to go through periodic safety training classes, or receive different certifications. You might also be required to document and report injuries or accidents to your supervisors, so it should be helpful if you are able to communicate clearly both orally and in writing. Some employers may ask you to make them aware of any unsanitary or hazardous conditions that you notice while working. If this applies to you in a particular job, you could be asked to communicate your findings in the form of a written report to your superiors.

Practical Adult Insights is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
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